UvA

Future seminars

 

2017-11-23 Alex Possajennikov (University of Nottingham)
Preventing the Tyranny of the Majority - Experiment on the Choice of Voting Thresholds under the Veil of Ignorance.
Room: E0.22, 16:00-17:15.
In democracies, an absolute majority of voters may choose policies that are harmful to others, even when the harm is larger than the benefit to the majority. We study how individuals choose threshold rules in voting situations, including where sub- or super-majority thresholds are optimal. In our experiment individuals choose thresholds knowing distributions of possible valuations of alternatives but not knowing their own valuation (veil of ignorance). As is optimal, subjects do propose more extreme thresholds for more skewed distributions. However, threshold choices are biased towards simple majority rule, leading to substantial welfare losses. We also identify systematic changes in subjects' decisions in response to variations in distributions of valuations, even when these variations do not change the optimal threshold choice.

 

2017-12-07 Wieland Mueller (University of Vienna)
Consistency and Stationarity of Time Preferences.
Room: E5.22, 16:00-17:15.
We report the results of an experiment in which subjects make a series of inter-temporal choices. The design of the experiment allows us to (a) use revealed preference analysis at the individual level to test for consistency with utility maximization as well as for stationarity of inter-temporal choices; and (b) to estimate a standard model of quasi-hyperbolic time preferences at the individual level. We docucment heterogeneity of individual intertemporal choices with respect to patterns of demand behavior and levels of consistency with utility maximization. Our data suggest that lack of consistency with economic rationality may be the driving force of estimated non-stationarities of time preferences. We explore the consequences of parametrically estimating preference parameters even if the assumption of well-defined preferences is questionable (which is a standard approach in the literature). As an aside, choices of subjects can be made visible by simple graphical representations (footprints), which often allow to easily identify basic features of subjects' time preferences without any formal analysis.

 

2017-12-21 Mariska Kret (University of Leiden)
tbd.
Room: E0.22, 16:00-17:15.
No abstract available.

 

2018-03-01 Yves Le Yaouanq (LMU Munich)
TBA.
Room: , 16:00-17:15.
No abstract available.

 

2018-05-03 Rachel Kranton (Duke University)
TBA.
Room: , 16:00-17:15.
No abstract available.

 

2018-06-21 Anya Samek (University of Southern California)
TBA.
Room: , 16:00-17:15.
No abstract available.